Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Aural Fullness and Meniere's Disease

Lately I have been experiencing a lot of problems with fullness in my ears. I don't know if it has been the weather which has turned from very hot to much cooler or maybe it is just something that happened without any cause. It is difficult to say I don't know if it has contributed to my recent bouts of Meniere’s disease attacks but it certainly couldn't have helped any. The occasional times that I have tinnitus haven't really increased although it is hard to determine because fullness in the ears sometimes mimics tinnitus, at least it seems that way to me. Fullness in the ears is sometimes referred to as aural fullness.




I have written in the past that I have always had problems with my ears especially when I was younger. Earaches were a common thing for me because I always seemed to get sick and it always seemed to end up with an ear infection. My only relief was from ear drops and antibiotics. As I got older the earaches went away and the only problems that I had with my ears was when I driving or riding over the mountains. I grew up in western Pennsylvania in a small town that was at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains so high elevation was a problem for my ears. I would often experience aural fullness but at the time thought nothing of it.



Luckily I don’t get many earaches now but this fullness in my ears is unpleasant and I am worry that it is a precursor to a major attack. Hopefully it wouldn’t I’ll have to wait and see.



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64 comments:

  1. David:
    my ears always get full before a major attack, that is how I know one is coming. Loud tinitus followed by a blocked ear means a major attack for me.
    Ronald

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  2. Hi David
    Over the last 2 years my aural fullness has been quite extreme but I've never tied it to an attack. When my tinitus went loud I knew I was in for it.

    Now, my ear is always full, the tinitus always loud but the meniett device seems to be working for the vertigo attacks, thank goodness! I may even be heading back to work next week :) My ENT will decide on Friday. So, even if the machine is expensive and my insurance won't cover it, I'll make more money working than not working so it will really be worth it financially and physically!
    I'm keeping my fingers crossed,
    Deb

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  3. David,

    The only thing we can control now is the vertigo, and it seems to take something different for every individual to control the attacks. Since the doctors cannot seem to find a way to make the inner ear work normal we will keep having the fullness and the tinnitus and just about everything I do causes fullness and effects the tinnitus level in my head. I have my attacks under control for the moment, but the fullness never leaves and it seems I am always walking on eggshells wondering when the next attack will be. When I was having attacks on a regular basis, my ear cleared up in between the attacks for short periods of time. The saying, What doesn't kill us makes us stronger, not Meniere's. I do not feel like a strong, confident person any more. Hope you can stay well through the Fall season.

    Sherry

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  4. @Ronald,
    The full ears seem to indicate an attack for a lot of folks
    thanks for the comment
    David

    @Deb,
    I’m glad that the meniett device is doing you some good. Hopefully your ent will give you good news.
    good luck
    David

    @Sherry,
    You are right this really is an unpredictable type of illnesses, what works for one doesn’t seem to help another. You just have to keep on trying.
    Hopefully everyone can have a spin-free Fall.
    Stay in touch
    David

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  5. Having another FULL night myself at the point of "explosive" pain. Got online to research, trying to drown out this obnoxious roaring, to see how much an affect the past 3 weeks of weather change forced attacks could be the cause of tonight's. Like always who knows...

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  6. It could be the weather, I've heard from a lot of other folks who are adversely affected by the weather
    thanks for commenting
    David

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  7. I have been suffering for 5 years, The ear pressure is so severe, the water pills help some but not enough...is there any hope for the pain...I am not sure where to turn, it is not getting any better...

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  8. Hi Cindy,
    The only thing that I can think of is to check with your doctor and ask him what your options are. If your doctor can't give you an answer get a second opinion. It took me awhile to find the right doctor.
    stay in touch and let us know how you are doing
    David

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  9. I have had ear fullness 24/7 since Feb. of this year. I have been diagnosed with bilateral Meniers by one specialist, TMJ by another and Migraine Aura by another. This is my only complaint. Help........what is your opinion.
    Teresa

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    Replies
    1. I totally relate. I have TMJ and was horrendously dizzy. Went to a great dentist, got a bite guard and it disappeared. When it came back, I thought maybe I should wear bite guard 24/7, or it was hormones..had never heard of MD. Therefore I went undiagnosed for 4-5 years. A pharmacist caught it when I was getting some Valium for the dizziness and asked if he had something to unplug my ear that had been full for years.

      The difference between TMJ dizzy and MD is that with TMJ it is was completely appositional. Changing position or even spinning around did not change it.

      I have TMJ and MD. But, the TMJ is 100% under control because of a very good dentist. I got lucky, many claim to know TMJ..but don't. The bite guard rearranged my bite which changed the way my nerves communicated to my brain and within 2 weeks I was fine. I still wear it every night.

      good luck. Keep asking and going until you get the right diagnosis.

      Delete
  10. The classic symptoms of Meniere's Disease are aural fullness, periodic loss of hearing, and vertigo. Do you have all three of those? If not, then they are premature in diagnosing bilateral Meniere's.

    Have you seen an ear/nose/throat specialist?

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  11. I wanted to correct something I said: The classic symptoms of Meniere's include tinnitus along with the aural fullness, periodic loss of hearing, and periodic vertigo.

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  12. hello
    I went to my ent/menieres specialist. sural fullness leading on to tinittus, which then leads on to the dizzines, and days/weeks/months of lowered hearing. for me its all about triggers over the years i have figured out what kinda things make the fullness comes. he suggested that i go on stelroid injections into the middle ear to deal with the inflamation, i am very excited has asnyone tried these injections.
    ali

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  13. I have read that some folks have found success with the steriod treatments let us know if you go ahead with them
    David

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  14. I've had a little success with steroid injections into the middle ear... not much. It works better for some people, so I hope it will work for you, Ali.

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  15. The more I read about this ailment, the more upset I get. I was just diagnosed three days ago. My ear started bothering me earlier this year with it seeming like I had water n my ear after a shower. It progressed on to feeling full even if I had not just had a shower. Internist looked in ear...said it looked fine. Still did not go away so I went to an ENT doc . Saw him one day and the next day they did a hearing test on me. They made the diagnosis from seeing the doc and the audiology test. Same meds: diuretic, and a low sodium diet....told me 2000 mg of sodium per day. So, I have only taken 3 diuretic pills so far and have cut back on sodium...but I STILL HAVE THE PRESSURE in my right ear. Drives me crazy. I was wondering how long I have to wait for RELIEF or is this feeling of pressure in the ear ongoing for me for the rest of my life? THIS IS MADDENING. There has to be better and healthier remedies for this horrible ailment. ANYONE?????

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  16. Unfortunately the reduction is sodium didn't help me much but the diuretic did. I know that seems like a contradiction but for some reason the diuretic works. I also continue to have pressure in my bad ear as well.
    if you feel that you are at a standstill seek a second opinion from another ENT. It really helps to get another perspective about this terrible disorder.
    David

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  17. hello
    i am going ahead with the stelroid injections, but one thing people on here should try is avoid foods with high histamine. as this can be for some people the reason for fullness in the ear.
    ali
    ps david i can no longer for some reason post with my google account does this happen to other people

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  18. Hi Ali,
    I will look in to it.
    thanks
    David

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  19. hello david
    when i am by the sea side i feel much better, it can even bring back my hearing within 8 hours. does anyone else have clear ears when they near the sea.
    it has to be fresh sea air ie atlantic ocean especially, the mediteranian sea is not so effective

    ali

    i can sign in with firefox, but with interent explorer it just wont let me write posts, just thought i would update you with that info:)

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  20. Thank you everyone for your posts - I am feeling so alone in my bilateral MD. I've had the diagnosis for 2 years now, but have suffered much longer not knowing what it was. The aural fullness is so difficult to deal with 24/7. I'm finding that aspartame is a big trigger for me (found out the hard way). Also, my ENT recommended the injections of steroids, however, the pain from the actual injection was the worst pain i've ever experienced (and I've had kidney stones) and could not experience more than one. Have others had this intolerable pain with the injection? Maybe I need a different doctor? thoughts?

    Thanks
    Kristin

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  21. Kristin, first of all, I'm so sorry you have bilateral MD. Having been through the hell of unilateral, I can't even begin to imagine how hard this must be for you.

    David (the blog's moderator/author) also has had extreme pain from the injections in the ear drum. On the other hand, it hasn't been too bad for me. I have no idea what the difference is.

    Does your doctor use a numbing agent first to make sure your eardrum will feel far less? My ENT used to squirt lydocaine into my ear to make the eardrum numb, then leave it to take effect for about 15 minutes. After that, the injection didn't feel like much at all to me.

    Did you try talking to your doctor about how much it hurt and asking him/her to find a way to make it hurt less? I assume another doctor would do it differently, but I don't know if another doctor could make it less painful for you.

    Good luck.

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  22. Thank you Peggy. From what I'm reading not everyone gets relief from the series of injections. I'll have to think about that treatment, and maybe see someone else. She only put some numbing solution on a q-tip and didn't let it sit. She gave the injection within 1 minute.

    The hardest part of all of this is surviving these "maddening" episodes alone because my family and others do not understand this disease. If you have any recommendations of how to help them understand, I'm open to anything. And to remember to really enjoy the functional days I do have.

    Thanks again for your quick response and this site. It has great information for all of us!

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  23. Ahhhhhhh... she's not giving it enough time to numb the eardrum, I'd bet on it. My doctor would squish the lydocaine in there, then let me sit for nearly 15 minutes. If she needed the exam room, I would sit in the waiting room until it took effect.

    Honestly, the best way to make family understand is to have them see you go through a serious attack. I had an attack in front of my husband, mother, brother, his wife and my nephew two years ago, and it shocked them more than I could say. If it weren't for that, I don't think they would really understand. Of course, my husband has seen me through plenty of attacks, sometimes almost having to carry me to the bathroom or bedroom.

    Otherwise, I would just describe the attacks for them in full gory detail, and let them see the apprehension. Talk about it. Really spell it out for them. A lot of people will never understand, but if they love you, it will sink in eventually.

    I like your comment about remembering to enjoy the functional days we do have. That's really true. It's easy to get caught up in how awful the attacks are and weighed down in anticipation. I'm pretty sick of it all right now, dying to do things, eager to get back into shape... it's awful to let a disease ruin my life even when I'm not having an attack!

    I'm also pretty pissed off that I've gained at least 10 pounds since I started having the serious attacks. A sedentary life of anxiety does NOT agree with me.

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  24. That's interesting because my doctor didn't let the numbing medicine sit in, he just gave the gent shot with no time in between.
    I wonder if that is standard procedure?
    thanks
    David

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  25. I don't know if it's standard procedure, but it could be that your doctors are too anxious to free up the exam rooms and keep the patients moving through... :P

    If I were you, I'd talk to them about how much the shot hurts (emphasize agony) and ask whether they can give you a numbing agent and allow time for it to take FULL effect.

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  26. hello
    i was on my smartphone, and i downloaded this game which was very visually active. after 5 minutes i had this attck for 15 seconds. it was the worst level of spinning i have ever had in my life, if it had carried on for the usual 4 hours menieres style attack i would have been sectioned as i was shouting in fear when it happened. has enyone every had this is this a drop attack?).
    regards
    ali

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  27. Ali~
    I've experienced what U are describing.
    I call it the "fast & furious" attack.
    Yes..thank God it's a quick one. If they lasted I would commit myself to the mental hospital. I stay upright even though I feel weak.. I do fall down when I have what I consider to be a true "drop attack", and I usually have regular length vertigo then. That's how it works with me anyway.

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  28. hello lauri
    usually with menieres i get a 10 second warning that something is about to happen, i lie down deal with it. this was something else i had no control whatsoever (it was verging on a fit), i am feeling a bit full at the moment and a bit deaf. things that are visually too stimulating when you feeling a bit deaf, it seems is a complete no no. i really hope this stelroid injections i take next friday is going to help with the fullness.
    regards
    ali

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  29. Ali, the steroid injection should help reduce the inflammation that's making your ear feel full. That attack sounds terrifying. I've never had the "fast and furious" version, only the long ones.

    But I'm familiar with the effect of excessive visual stimiulus on Meniere's. I was in a crowd just two days ago, and all the movement of people around me, while walking myself and trying to look at different things, made me very dizzy and left me with very blurred vision. Kind of awful.

    By the way, I've now been rejected again for Social Security Disability. So now I have to wait for a meeting with a judge to review my case, which could take nine months, or more than a year. *sigh*

    I need to find things to do to stay busy during that time, or I'll go mad. I also need to find ways to generate some money, which is going to be interesting. We're still working on getting our house ready for sale, and then we'll move into a less expensive, smaller home in an area of NJ with lower taxes. Fun times.

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  30. hello peggy
    yes it was very frightning,
    very sad to hear about your economic situation, this is one of the areas that really annoys me with menieres is people do not understand how disabling it is in day to day life.
    regards
    ali

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  31. Ali~
    When you had the fast/furious attack, did you have the sensation of being smacked hard backwards? I did. I never actually moved backwards..but the sensation was there.
    NO warning for me with this attack.
    You said you were playing a visual game...I was scrolling on the computer when it hit.
    Coincidence that quick moving back-lit visual stimuli was what set us off for those attacks? I don't think so.
    I have said it before & I truly believe.. Menieres is not just caused by Hydrops.

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  32. Peggy~
    Your previous blog got me thinking..if you are in the process for SSD, how are you supposed to try and bring in money to survive, w/out them saying you are able to work?
    And how are you supposed to work when you have intractable Menieres/vertigo??
    A real Catch-22.
    This is now my problem too.
    As it is...I've already lost my career, my good credit, and my house to this wretched disease. I'm in an apartment now, and only getting by due to help from Family. They won't be able to help me much longer though. All my hopes were pinned on the operation working, and my getting back to work. Not an option now.
    It's totally insane what they put us through.
    Hopefully we will all be able to get some help soon. Makes me so mad when I think of all the money we've paid in over the years!
    No-one wants to have this disease & have to go the disability route.
    SSD needs to knock off the game playing.

    I say Kudos to all of us though for hanging in there despite the vertigo and fighting back! :)

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  33. Yes, Lauri, that's EXACTLY the Catch-22. My lawyers tell me if I do anything, no matter how part-time, to try to bring in more money, they will probably say I'm able to work and deny me.

    At the same time, it's extremely unlikely I will be able to work full-time. I'm not having full-blown attacks, but I have chronic dizziness, and any activity that lasts more than, say, 20 minutes leaves me exhausted. I can't hear what people say unless the environment is extremely quiet, and I can't be around a lot of activity without getting totally dizzy and queasy.

    Find yourself a disability attorney and apply through them. They only get paid if you get approved, and then it's a percentage of your first payment. The first payment is pro-rated and retroactive to the date you first filed, so it's important to file asap. And see if you can find out about other ways to get money to fill in the gap. Maybe a local disability lawyer would have ideas about that?

    It's hard for me to think about all we are going through without getting really angry.

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  34. hello laura
    exactly what you describe is what happened, it was like a spasm and my body locked/looked upwards and for 20 seconds i had no control whatsoever, hence i was shouting for help (which i have never done) the truth is though when your ears are blocked the attacks are round the corner anyway, and the blockage in the ear also makes the eyes more active to componsate for the hearing nerves, so i guess it was just too much for my eyes to take in. but i am going to my dr on monday to tell them what happened.
    regarding work i was someone at 30 who just graduated with a 2:1 degree in business, and i was very fit, the world was my oyster. then menieres takes over, wow how your dreams and hard work can dissappear in such a short time. i am very fortunate that i have loving sisters and my parents left us in a situation that is quite fortunate.
    it is very hard to have full time work with menieres as when the fatigue kicks in so does the attacks.
    only job thats possible is a part time job that you are allowed to pop in to, at your own convienance. ie family business otherwise no one is going to employ you, cause your sick days will be about 200 days per annum :)
    regards
    ali

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  35. hi, i just found your group and have been dealing with this problem for 20 years

    i found that i became much more functional when i had tubes placed in my ear drums, it relieved the fullness feeling (i also get fluid in my ears due to reactions to petro-chemical i.e. perfumes, plug in air fresheners etc)

    i can't know what is best for everyone, but all with this problem look around your homes for scented pdts. that you can live without and get rid of them

    the steroid injections are really temporary, i even was able to work almost 7 years until things got too bad

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  36. Dizzybroad~
    You're the second person who's post I've seen that said they had relief from tubes in the ears.
    Did it effect your hearing at all?
    Do you have bilateral Menieres, and were the tubes put in both ears?
    Welcome!
    Lauri

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  37. The tubes should not affect hearing, and it didn't when I had one. I did notice relief from the full feeling when I had a tube, and sometimes I wish I still had one. But on the other hand, my eardrum developed an infection around the tube site, and the tube had to be removed. That was NOT fun. And it would make me think twice about doing it again.

    Lauri, it's probably worth talking to your new ENT about. It could help with the full feeling and balance issues. It did for me for awhile, and I have a friend who has one permanently installed. She has to have it cleaned out by her ENT a few times a year, but that's it for her.

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  38. Peggy~
    I think I will talk with him about it.
    That's awful that you infected, especially if it gave some relief.
    How do they do it, and does it hurt or cause any vertigo right after?
    Piercing the eardrum sounds scary.

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  39. hello
    i am having a grommet put in my ear, are these the same tubes you are all talking about. the reason i am having it is cause i explained to my dr about the clicking noises i get in my ear. (clicking noises are good for me, when they stop i am usually more deaf and more full around the ear area)
    also having a stelroid injectiom at the same time.
    regards
    ali

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  40. Ali~
    I'm not sure, I haven't had it done.
    I know they put tubes in the ears of children when they have problems. I wonder if tubes for adults are the same?
    As to whether or not tubes and grommets are the same, not sure...but post once you have it done and tell us how it went and if it helped.

    If anyone else has had a positive response to having tubes put in, please let me know, as I might consider trying it.

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  41. I'm also having a tube put in, in December. They are known as grommets, ventilation tubes, PE tubes - they all mean the same thing and are the same as what children have. My ENT said they don't know why they work in menieres but sometimes they just do! I've just come out of a cluster of attacks that lasted 9 weeks, but still going with the tube in the hope it will stop further problems.

    I've also recently tried accupuncture ( so far had 4 sessions). All I can say is that last year my cluster lasted 9 months and this time it was 9 weeks! Is this a coincidence or did it really work? It's too hard to tell really. Last year was my first real cluster (now had it for 2 years) so maybe it's the natural progression of the disease ( as in I'm now in a different stage and the attacks are less severe/frequent anyway) who knows! The attacks have manifested to short but really intense attacks where I drop to the floor! Anyway I hope I get another nice remission - preferably a permanent one!

    I'll keep you updated on how the tube goes!

    Becky

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  42. Yes, tubes and grommets are the same thing. In addition to relieving some of the pressure, they make it possible for the patient to administer medication at home that the doctor would otherwise have to inject through the eardrum. I did this with gentamicin for awhile.

    I found it didn't hurt at all to have it installed. It was an in-office procedure, done in a matter of seconds. The longest part was waiting for the local anesthesia to take full effect. It IS scary, mostly because it's a rather creepy idea for most of us, but it's pretty much a big nothing when it's actually done.

    Good luck... and don't stress out over it. In all probability, you will barely notice it. I recommend having someone go with you to distract you, if the doctor will let you. My husband went with me, and he kept me talking and laughing while the doctor did her thing.

    The infection was unexpected and annoying, but I think the doctor felt the tube wasn't necessary any more anyway, so removing it was an easy decision to make. But sometimes I wonder if it would help to try it again.

    It bothers me sometimes that my left eardrum has so much scarring now, from shots and the tube insertion and the infection. Oh, well. The ear can't hear anyway. But it still makes me sad that we've done so much to destroy my left ear. :(

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  43. Thanks Becky and Peggy!

    Ali~
    I'm going to wait and see what having the tube put in does for you, before I attempt it.
    Please keep me posted.

    David~
    Have you given any thought to having tubes done?
    Lauri

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  44. Hi Lauri,
    after all the problems with the gent injections I am really hestitant to do that
    David

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  45. hello lauri
    will be a pleasure to keep you updated, i will be having the op within 2 months.
    the doctor gave me a leaflet, here are the main point regarding grommets.
    what are grommets? grommets are very samll plastiic tubes, which sit in a hole in the eardrum. they let air get in and out of the ear. this keeps the ear healthy.
    why do we use grommets? some people get fluid behind the eardrum. this is sometimes called glue ear. it is very common in young children, but it can happen in adults also.
    also in the leaflet there is alot reagrding children, hence i think it is something that is highly used for children, and not so much for adults.
    my doctor explained to meet this is the first line of attack in terms of operations for my menieres.
    regards
    ali

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  46. David, I was thinking about you when I wrote my last post... I think it's worth talking to your ENT about this. Surely they would use much stronger anesthesia to insert a grommet than they do for a simple injection? Can't hurt to ask. But I can understand why you would be apprehensive, after your experiences. :(

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  47. I had a tube put in my ear after my first sac surgery, and inserting the tube didn't hurt very much, but my ear was VERY swollen afterward and was just taking to long to get back to normal, so I had my Dr. remove it. That was the worst pain I have ever experienced in my life. I literally screamed in his office.

    I just had another surgery where this time my Dr. put a shunt in, and now instead of constant pressure, it comes and goes through out the day. I can deal with that, I guess, as opposed to constant pressure that leads to having an episode. But if things get worse, I might think about putting a tube in again. If that happens, I'll keep it in until my ear heals around it. I think my ear just takes longer to heal.

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  48. Tara~
    I had the sac decompression surgery (w/out the shunt), and it only lasted 4 months before full vertigo returned.
    How long did yours last, and were you completely free of vertigo during that time?

    Thanks Ali!

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  49. The first surgery I had was without the shunt as well, and I was doing really well with no vertigo or pressure for about four months, then I had to have thyroid surgery, and right after that, my ear got bad again, no full fledged vertigo, but lots of pressure with some vertigo during the night. I've had the shunt in for about 6 weeks now, and so far, no vertigo. Only slight pressure on and off during the day and MAJOR tennitus. I guess it's a trade-off.
    I am currently looking into acupuncture for the pressure and tennitus.

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  50. Hello this is my first time posting
    I work as a gp in Birmingham. I was diagnosed with bilateral meniers. 6 years ago. I worked full time (45 hours) was lucky my attacks usually come in bouts and usually in the evenings ( after a busy day at work)
    Unfortunately the last 16 months my left ear has been active most the time with weekly 8-9 hour severe attacks. I was managing this and work till 5 weeks ago when I suddenly lost my hearing in both ears , now having attacks 2-3 times a week with milder giidiness nausea tiredness in-between.
    I have had the grommets 4 weeks ago with intratympanic steroids ( after a course of oral steroids.
    This isn't helping yet and as I have no sick pay I'm back working admin only ( as can't see patients until I get my hearing aids sorted)I can't manage more than 2-3 hours without symptoms.
    They're talking about gentamycin next but seemed to be worried about the chance of totally losing hearing.
    I'm hoping not to go down the route of I'll health retirement but can't imagine doing 11 hour days again!

    Sarah

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  51. Hi Sarah, it's a horrible disease! I have it in my left ear and I'm only 24 :(. I'm also in my last year of pharmacy at uni and I'm worried about the future and if I'll be able to work! I had a grommet fitted last week and since then my hearing and tinnitus has been awful. I was wondering if any of you who have had this done also experienced this? I'm hoping it's due to swelling and my consultant said it will take a couple of weeks to heal properly. I hope you get better soon.

    Becky

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  52. hello sarah
    before gent they say you should try saccus decompression.
    i am seen at the royal national ear nose and throat at kings cross, there is a dr there by the name of Dr Rudrapathy Palaniappan, he is the best regarding menieres in england.
    also has great access to the surgeons in the hospital.
    hope this helps on a good note you are new to menieres (the first 4 years were the worst for me) and over time you learn little triggers (allergies, migraines, etc)
    stay strong
    regards
    ali

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  53. I went to one of the best otologist/neurotologist/otolaryngolgists in America today. Though I still need more testing, she thinks my aural fullness comes from acid reflux. Its something to think about so I hope this helps someone.

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  54. hello anon
    i have been down the acid reflux route, it could be a trigger but i doubt its the core reason for aural fullness.
    menieres is a monster, that can not be killed as for now, but for sure there are ways at making the monster sleep for a while:)
    ali

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  55. hello anon
    regarding your post about acid reflux, when i first had really bad menieres i went down this road, as i alsways had stomach probems. but because back then i had so many other things i needed to sort out regarding my diet and lifestyle, the route of acid reflux was not so obvious.
    yesterday i decided to take gaviscon which is for acid reflux. i have noticed an improvement on the hearing/aural fullness, and feeling a bit better, going to dr on wednesday for some mediicine for acid reflux.
    ali

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  56. I have always felt my Meniere's was somehow connected with my Eustachian tubes and at one time when the doctor (non-specialist) looked down my throat he said the entrances to one of the tubes looked a bit inflamed. He thought it could be a reflux problem and prescribed me a course of 20mg Omeprazole.

    It didn't seem to make any difference and we didn't go any further down that road, but interesting that others are linking reflux and Meneire's.

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  57. Does anyone know how I could find out if my MD is possibly autoimmune??

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    Replies
    1. I'm also very interested in this, Tricia. I have a number of ideopathic problems that all seem to have possible autoimmune causes, but I don't think doctors understand autoimmune problems well enough to put it all together yet.

      But if I come across any clues about this, I'll come back and post.

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    2. Tricia,
      Blood work and see a Rheumatologist who works with your ENT...from what I know. If your ears respond to high dose steroids then your ENT might refer you.
      A Rheumatologist is going to look at your chances of having another autoimmune disease that could be exacerbating your condition. But this is just from some experience.
      Hope this helps.

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  58. I'm quite the oddity here. I have Menier's, but I've also been diagnosed with migraine associated vertigo and I have a brain tumor pressing under the auditory canal of the opposite ear of the Menier's ear.

    I had temporary, then permanent ear tubes put in over the last two years. The relief in the Menier's ear was indescribable. The right side was done for equalization.

    I get dizzy and I spin a bit, but vertigo isn't my biggest annoyance. Right now the tinnitus in the tumor ear is so loud that I can't hear it any longer in the Menier's ear. I had radiation 9 weeks ago on the tumor, so that should start to fade in the next couple months.

    My biggest problem is the fullness and pain in the Menier's ear. I can actually hear water sloshing around in there and sometime bubbles popping (not a crackling noise). Sometimes the pressure is so bad, I want to stick a needle in my ear to relieve it. Many times I would swear there is water pouring out of my ear, but when I put my finger there, it's completely dry.

    I do notice that when the barometer dips below 30, my fullness gets worse. Perhaps because of my tubes, flying and elevation don't bother me at all.

    I do watch my salt and take a diuretic.

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    1. Wow, Tracy, that is quite a combination. I'm so sorry, and I hope you and your doctors find a solution that gives you more relief soon.

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  59. I've had fullness of ears since I was about 8 or 9 years old, nothing was done during doctor visit. I was finally diagnosed with Meniere's in 2009 (decades later). I watch what I eat, don't want an attack far away from a job to home on commute back. I was dizzy for three solid weeks, couldn't keep tomate soup or water down even, I heaved it out eventually. I forced myself to eat and not throw it up later. Sometimes when I turned wrong on the bed it made me heave shortly afterwards, usually on my side, didn't matter on my left or right side. I lost about ten pounds, which is alot considering my normal weight is 135. My 29 waist jeans were very loose after it started and I was later diagnosed. A weird after effect (affect?) is now I get hiccups daily (usually after I get something to drink) but I can control how long the hiccups last, three to four hiccups, then I just stop them. My dizziness usually lasts for about six hours per episode. Yes I watch sodium, but now I have to avoid my old favorites, such as ham and egg cheese croisandwiches from BK, processed ham really does a number on me. Bananas give me a buzz also.

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