Sunday, March 18, 2012

The early spring and Meniere’s disease

In Atlanta we usually don’t have much of a winter, a few ice storms and maybe a little snow spread out through the season. We did have a pretty good snow storm at least for us last year, the snow and ice was enough to shut the local schools down for a week. But not this year, no ice storms or snow and the temperature rarely went below freezing. The question that I am wondering now is how this unusual weather will affect my Meniere’s disease?


As we all know the weather has a profound effect on Meniere’s. In the summer the heat always seems to bring out the worse in my dizzy spells and going in and out of the air conditioning doesn’t seem to help either. On the other hand the cool weather isn’t a trigger for my attacks; at least I don’t think so. But the spring is a different story especially this spring where the temperatures have already hit 80 degrees! Spring also brings allergies that can be so harmful for some folks with Meniere’s. I really hope that this early spring isn’t an indication of a long hot summer. If it is I’ll be in trouble.

Just a note on my Social Security case, I have filed another appeal which means Social Security will set up hearing for me. How long will be before the hearing, I don’t know but it could be a while.

Feel free to comment and please subscribe to my RSS Feed

Thanks

12 comments:

  1. Ive recently noticed this in the UK that my Menieres Disease seems to keep being triggered off but we seem to be having warmer weather which means my hayfever has started earlier than usual. But I hadnt considered that the hayfever could be making my Menieres worse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Leanne,
      Yes, my doctors have said there can be a strong correlation between allergies and the inflammation that triggers Meniere's attacks, so it's a great idea to stay on top of treating your allergies as well as you can. I have asthma, and we are also having unseasonably warm weather and an early spring and early allergy season here on the east coast of the U.S. Every little bit helps.

      David, an interesting note for you: I saw my ophthalmologist today, and he confirmed that I have ocular migraines. I wonder if there's a connection to Meniere's at all... The eye/ear connection doesn't seem to be pursued by researchers very often with regard to Meniere's, but I suspect there's something there.

      Delete
  2. hello leanne
    anything ear, nose throat related, i believe will aggravate menieres. its a highly sensetive illness, and its a fine balance between good days and bad days. finding your triggers is a really good starting point.
    regards
    ali

    ReplyDelete
  3. David, good luck with the latest round of the disability battle.

    I'm still deep in the doldrums of Waiting Hell. The next step for me will be judicial review, but I'm not optimistic. I have no idea what to expect, realistically, but maybe I'm just pessimistic in general about anything to do with Meniere's.

    I hope you get the payments started soon.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Peggy,
    that is an interesting point I'll do some research on it.
    thanks
    David

    ReplyDelete
  5. Barometric pressure changes and spring allergies (pollen, mold and dust) certainly will affect MD. Any ENT worth anything will affirm your suspicions. I've been to Washington University in St. Louis and they agree.
    Right now, the tinnitus is so bad I can't sleep. It will be like this until mid summer...IF the weather settles. Last year it didn't. I can ski in the winter, barely able to get out of bed in the spring.

    As for needing to appeal MD for disability, I think it's outrageous. MD has it's own paragraph under Social Security Disability. I am under FMLA and only work part-time. I am lucky/very grateful to be in a profession that part-time people have the same rights as full-time. Many years of bilateral MD, lost mucho income from MD, and it will affect my pension.
    I hope to continue to keep working as long as I can.

    Wishing you the best in your appeal.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Peggy,
    I hope your judical review goes well also,
    good luck!
    David

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, David. And now I have a little more ammunition to add to the pile, with a positive diagnosis of ocular migraine from my ophthalmologist.

      The worst part is the waiting. I have no idea yet how much longer it will be until I even get to meet with the judge, and in the meantime, the anxiety and financial issues are killing us. I almost wish I could get a definitive answer now, whether it's yay or nay, just to be DONE with it.

      Delete
  7. I found out I had MD in 2002 after the birth of my first daughter. I had a drop attack and then minor symptoms until Jan of this year. I had a drop attck at work and have not been able to go back. I have not been able to go longer than two days without vertigo and brain fog. I have found great comfort in reading these posts. I have been to my regular ENT, my regular Dr, a neurologist, and now an Otolaryngologist at MUSC here in Charleston. Today I found out that on top of my MD I have vestibular migraines. Here's hoping that there is an end in sight. Thank you for helping my feel that I'm not alone in this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. April,
      My complete MD symptoms started as well following the birth of my first child in 1995. I went through a second pregnancy with MD 3 years later, went bilateral MD, then had the EMS surgery in my worst ear which helped me tremendously when my second son was only 5 months old. I realize that this does not help everyone, but I had many good years. I have had good LUCK until 2011. That's all I think it is, LUCK. Things aren't so great right now.

      Thank you for writing. Your helping me cope too.

      Delete
  8. I understand all too well the dread of trying to incorporate work, even on a a casual/part-time basis with Menieres Disease.The first attack of vertigo I ever had was while at work in a mall.The general manager of the retail store I worked with at the time was unbelievably understanding of my condition when I didn't have a clue what was going on. She thought it was migraine attacks and would wait patiently for hours at a time to drive me home when I couldn't drive myself.In terms of it being an 'invisible' disorder, you couldn't be more accurate. My family expects me to just get up and get on with my life as if this is not happening to me on a daily basis at all.I am now at the point where the vertigo has subsided and I am looking of for part-time or casual work that I can manage my symptoms of hearing loss, poor coordination and general balance issues. It's a daunting task,let me tell you.It's important to stay mentally focused on the positive, I believe to enjoy the best quality of life I can at this point.I have days of very low energy, mentally and physically, and on those days I try to listen to what my body is telling me and rest more.There is light at the end of every tunnel: sometime we just have to focus more to see it!

    ReplyDelete
  9. You have a good attitude about how to deal with disorder and that can be so very important.
    good luck
    David

    ReplyDelete