Sunday, April 8, 2012

What meds I now take for Meniere’s

When I was initially diagnosed with Meniere’s disease I don’t think that I was prescribed any type of medication except a diuretic and a med to help replenish the potassium lost. I didn’t start taking antivert till a few months after that, a doctor in the emergency room recommended it. And yet another emergency room doctor told me to take valium before an attack. I took both of those meds for quite a while but I don’t anymore. I really don’t think that they help much.

As for not taking the antivert I really can’t tell exactly when an attack is going to happen anymore. When they do come on I lie down on the bed and just wait till it’s over.  The valium is another story like the antivert it made me very tired which is bad because I am tired most of the time anyway.

The only Meniere’s type medication that I take now is the potassium saving diuretic triamterene which I do believe has helped me and the great thing about this diuretic is no loss of potassium which means I don’t have to take a giant potassium pill!

The thing that made me think about medication is all the comments about meds that are prescribed for Meniere’s disease. Serc is certainly a popular medication everywhere (except the USA) and there are many supplements like vertigoheel  and gingko that helps some folks but it seems that almost every day I read about a new type of medicine that someone has been prescribed. And that is good news because it means that doctors are looking at Meniere’s from all different angles.

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45 comments:

  1. Very interesting about feeling you've been helped by that diuretic. I was on furocemide (aka Lasix) for quite a few years, and come to find out, Lasix can bring on Meniere's. Who wouldda thunk? I don't know if that's what's caused my Meniere's, but ...

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  2. I have been taking a low dose of Lasix for 4 days now.The ringing in my ears is constantly much louder. Has this happened to anyone else?

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    1. Why not use diazide?

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    2. I used diazide before the lasix. Diazide gave me very high blood pressure and a dangerously fast heartrate. Dr. said to never take it again. I am now off the lasix. ENT said to stop taking it. Turns out that lasix can cause permanent hearing loss. The tinnitus has quieted down to how it was before.

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    3. That's an unusual reaction, since diazide (triamterene) is prescribed to treat high blood pressure. It's a diuretic that is supposed to help reduce fluid retention, and under normal circumstances it would lower blood pressure. Too bad it had the opposite effect for you, anonymous!

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  3. Hi,
    I'm not that familiar with lasix and how it affects tinnitus. You might want to let your Dr. know about
    thanks
    David

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  4. I've been taking Triametrine also and (fingers crossed) have not had an attack in over a year. I thought I should let you know though that when I was switched to triamterene about a year ago I quit taking my potassium supplement and then maybe 4-6 months later found myself in the ER with heart palpitations getting IV potassium, which I recommend to no one!!! The way it was explained to me is that it is a potassium sparing diuretic but it still does deplete potassium, only at a slower rate. I started taking my potassium again but for some reason it has become a bit of a struggle regulating it.

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  5. I quit all the meds. and went on a anti-inflammation diet. I also watch my sodium, but not as much as I stay away from food that can cause inflammation. I have had Meniere's Disease for going on five years now. I have not
    had a bad vertigo attack for going on a year and a half. I do have drop attacks about 3 to 4 times a year, and my balance is off sometimes. I also take supplements that are to help with inflammation.

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  6. That is kind of scary about having a potassium deficienty I'm glad that it was caught in time. I try to get my blood work done on a regular basis so hopefully there wouldn't be any problems.
    thanks for the comment
    David

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  7. to anon
    any chance you can write down some foods that cause inflamation
    regards

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    1. Ali, this is a list of inflammatory foods that I found online:

      * nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant)
      * dairy
      * chocolate
      * eggs
      * citrus fruits
      * high-fat red meat
      * wheat products
      * processed foods
      * red wine, coffee, tea, and sodas

      I spoke to a holistic nurse/nutritionist a few weeks ago, and she recommended I cut way back on sugars, carbs, red meats, dairy, and the "bad" fats. All that was to address inflammation. Does that help?

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    2. thanks peggy
      90% if the items listed i dont go near, but things like tomatoes and rice (carbs), are not so easy to eliminate from ones diet. guess i will have to work on it even more.
      regards
      ali

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    3. I would find it nearly impossible to give up tomatoes, but I recently started making dishes with quinoa (spelling?) that to me are very similar to rice dishes. In addition, quinoa is a bit of a super food, so I'm trying to do much more with it.

      Instead of bread I'm using very low-fat, low-carb rye crisp crackers. And I've gone off sugar almost altogether. It's not easy, but I'm hoping it will be worth it. I'm using Stevia extract where I would normally put sugar in my tea, and I've switched to drinks that have Splenda instead of sugar. I'm also drinking a lot more water.

      Giving up breakfast pastries and pancakes is tough. It's a process.

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    4. hello peggy
      quinoa really irritates my menieres, only carbs i eat are rice and gluten free bread/pasta (usually corn or rice based). but i think genereally as carbs turn to sugar ,one should limit the amount for sure.
      what diet you exactly on?
      ali

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    5. I'm not on a defined "diet." I spent a couple of hours with a nurse practitioner who is a nutritionist to come up with some general recommendations of areas where I should limit intake (certain types of fats, carbs) and other areas where I should try to get more (proteins, fiber, leafy and/or green veggies and fruits). It's a very loose approach designed to push my eating habits in a healthier direction, so there are no "rules," just broad guidelines. I haven't got the hang of it yet, either.

      It's going to become increasingly important, too, because I have just been diagnosed with some kind of complicated migraines, and the same foods seem to act as triggers for Meniere's and migraines. That figures. :P

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    6. When it comes to migraines and Menieres, there seems to be a strong connection. My ENT described a vertigo attack as a migraine of the inner ear. When I was actively having many vertigo attacks,certain things would trigger them. MSG in food additives like Doritos would bring one on for me- and still does,very infrequently,as I know to avoid them. I have never been a big cheese eater or red-wine drinker, so they are not my triggers.I never had a migraine like condition in my life before developing Menieres disease.I've read lately that the portion of your brain that epilepsy is affected by is the same area for migraines, vertigo, etc.Clearly there is a vascular condition or weakness that is triggered by any one of these conditions.

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  8. I just started the GAPS Diet to help with my Meniere's Disease (http://gapsdiet.com/). I also currently taking Vertin and Nootrophil.

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  9. Does anyone notice how quickly the diuretic works? I was recently diagnosed, and the dizziness/vomiting is MUCH improved, however the ringing almost seems worse (or I just didn't pay attention before). I did have a day where I forgot to take the med and I have several episode of dizziness that day so I'm wondering if it's coincidence or if it works that quickly.

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  10. Catherine AndriopoulosApril 13, 2012 at 4:42 PM

    Great site! This is awesome to share such experiences. It wasn't like this when I first was hit with Meniere's 6/1996. I got hit with the loss of balance first on both sides. I fell over in the car I was driving with baby in the front in a car seat, on the highway.I fell over onto the seat. I pulled the steering wheel to the right where my car had was wandering, hoping to stop it. I prayed to God not to let us die this way. I floated onto an exit and into a bank parking lot. I still cry about it. MD wasn't very well known then. I fell out of the car onto the pavement. People surrounded me- sure enough, it had to be drugs, liquor or a stroke. Nope...3 mos of cat scans, xrays, evaluated by doctors in NE and they told me I had a brain tumor. That was their only explanation. They said maybe another month to live unless I would consider eploratory brain surgery.I said NO. I was a single mom with 3 sons and no one but friends to help me get through the most devastating time of my life. I wrote a letter to say goodbye to my boys. My oldest said no way this happening. My friends refused to leave me alone. They babysat my kids, and me, as my professional career was left behind. As the virus moved into time off mode, it subsided into one side of my head. I am so glad I said No. They tried every diet, medications, everything on me. Nothing worked. I suffered for 6 months with complete loss of balance, bad vertigo, ear ringing, black outs when I turned my head the slightest. I felt the wall and crawled along the floor to move about. Talk about bad times. Doctor after Doctor my bestfriend took me. Then she was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. We both drank ourselves under the table. The next morning I woke up and I could stand and move. The virus had moved to one side of my head. My doctor said the fluid had been dried up and now he knew what i had for certain. I pleaded to go to physical therapy after watching an olympic swimmer with vertigo lose her chance at the gold medal. They treated her with physical therapy and she went back into competition. My dr. thought i was crazy but he said lets try it. We did, 3 months later and I could walk and turn a little. I could manage the symptoms in one ear. I started back to work part time with dark glasses and the will power that wouldn't let me fail. They offered my full disability and I refused. I fought the disease. Twelve years later and I was still very very angry at the whole scenario. Then in 2/2008 I had freak painful accident that damaged my spinal cord; 5 surgeries, fusion, implant and many doctors later I can hardly walk. I have never had so much pain in my life. Like my legs being severed from my body. I have been detiorating fast and they tell me I have failed back syndrome/surgery ontop of a lot of other medical problems. And sure enough last month it began with headaches. Now the noise is driving my ear crazy, vertigo is acting up. MD is back and it is trying to play housemate with my spinal cord injuries. I see a specialist next week. Just thought I would share my awful story with you. But I will manage to get through this again, but this time with help from people who understand what this is all about. I have been researching the treatments and medications. I would appreciate any help... Any help I can offer...

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  11. Hi, this really has helped. I have not been diagnosed with menieres but i have every symptom. And after last night i was so upset. I couldnt get it from my bed. I would get so dizzy. I think what i had was a "drop attack" I was standing talking to my friend who was over at my house and i got so dizzy and without realizing what happened i was on the ground. I felt like i had to puke. And i couldnt explain what was happening. I knew i have attacks of vertigo. But this was crazy. So i did some research and ended up here. Ive had ringing of the ears for a really long time now. Dizzy spells, ect. But last night was the first time i fell to the ground. I couldn't eat or drink i felt so sick i would puke it up. The reason i know about vertigo is my mother has it and when i started showing symptoms, very aggressive ones, she told me about it. But i was confused as to how to explain to her that its really worse then she thinks. I was in tears it was so bad. Im only 16, and i was wondering is it possible for someone of such a young age to have this? I remember the first time i got an attack of dizziness. I didnt know what was happening. It was two years ago and i was doing my hair. My vision kind of went black and blurry and i was holding on to the walls. I brushed it off thinking it was just due to being tired. But it happened more. And i brushed it off. But within the past week its gotten worse. As i explained to a point were im vomiting and falling to the ground. I want to talk to my mother about seeing a doctor but i dont know how to explain whats going on. my boyfriend stayed up with me. i was up till 3 in the morning. I couldn't sleep. And that dizziness i get when standing i got even when laying down. So if anyone could answer a few of my questions it would be wonderful.Is it possible to be this young and have this disease? Should i see a doctor? What do you think is happening? Thank you so much for taking your time to read this.

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    1. Hi, Taylor, I'm so sorry you're going through this at such a young age. It is unusual, but I don't think it's unheard of.

      I have a couple of questions. Do your ears feel full, and does your hearing fluctuate at all? I am asking because you mention your vision, and that's not one of the most common or central symptoms of Meniere's Disease, but it IS a major symptom of migraines, which can also make you dizzy and nauseated. And some people have both Meniere's and migraines. I do.

      You should most definitely see a doctor. You could start with your internist or general practitioner, and from there you might see an ear/nose/throat specialist or maybe even a neurologist (if your doctor thinks that it could be migraines).

      Don't be scared if they want to do a test like an MRI. Most of us who have Meniere's have had to go through MRIs to make sure the vertigo and nausea are not caused by something really bad. It's done to rule out the other possibilities.

      Regarding how to tell your mother, maybe you could just show her your post on this blog? That explains what you are going through pretty well, and the blog also provides many examples of people who are living with similar symptoms.

      If you need any support or advice or just want to share how you are feeling with people who understand, come on back and post. And I hope you feel better soon.

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    2. Because of your age, get allergy tested too, both food (blood work) and environmental (skin testing).I was 17 when my symptoms started, not diagnosed until 8 years later when all the symptoms hit me at once.

      I agree with Peggy. See a Neurotologist too in addition to your primary doctor and get the tests they need to help you.

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    3. Taylor- I think people of any age can be afflicted with Menieres. I know of a couple of quite young women who've had hearing loss issues since birth, who haven't been diagnosed with MD, but they seem to suffer greatly with this debilitating condition.I would also encourage you to see an ENT specialist ASAP, who specializes in diseases of the ear. I don't thing general physicians know this much about Menieres. I wish you well!

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  12. I've had Meniere's since last August. Before I was diagnosed, my primary care doc prescribed Meclizine, Zofran, and Clonazepam. I love the Zofran for nausea and still use it - I can take one or two 4mg tablets and have relief from the nausea within 30 minutes, but I couldn't continue working if I was on Meclizine or Clonazepam. I am really sensitive to any medications that cause sedation, so both of these left me too drowsy to function.

    After diagnosis, the ENT started me on the low sodium diet and Dyazide. The low sodium diet helps a little in reducing the frequency of attacks from daily or multiple times a day to only happening 4-5 times a week. I couldn't tolerate the Dyazide - my BP was all over the place and it felt like the worst hangover of my life all 9 days before the doc took me off it. I would rather have vertigo episodes a few times a week than feel like death warmed over 24/7.

    My doc suggested the trans-derm scop patches next. They helped reduce the frequency down to 2-4 attacks a week, and I had a few great weeks with almost no vertigo at all. The patches left my eyes partially dilated all the time along with blurry near vision and dry mouth for the first day of every new patch, but it wasn't intolerable. 2-4 attacks a week still isn't great with work, so my ENT referred me to another specialist who only deals with ears. He wants me to try the Meniett device or endolymphatic sac decompression surgery, and also wanted me to wean off the patches. After 4 solid months on the patch, withdrawal was pretty bad, and now I'm back to having episodes almost every day, especially since we've had a terrible storm front coming through for the last 4 days.

    I'm still trying to decide between the Meniett and the surgery. My insurance declined the Meniett device, but will pay for the surgery. Doc said there's about a 60% success rate with either treatment. Any thoughts?

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  13. Hi Drea,
    I'm sorry to hear about the time you are having with meniere's. I know when you in the early stages this disorder it can be difficult to come to grips with it.
    First of all I know what you mean about meclizine, it really made me tired as well. I don't take it anymore.
    as for the meniett device, some folks like it others don't, I was going to try it also but my insurance wouldn't cover it.
    From what I understand anyone can have meniere's no matter what age they are although it seems to be particulaly bad for those over the age of 40.
    I would try to get least another opinion before jumping into surgery. I'm not a doctor but it makes sense to do some hard thinking before going under the knife.

    thanks for commenting and stay in touch
    David

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  14. Hello all, first of all. I discovered this blog on my twitter feed and I must contribute what works in helping me deal with Menieres disease. I was diagnosed with MD in 2010 by a very good ENT in my province. I had several tests after two years of very obvious symptoms,including severe vertigo, dizziness, balance issues. I can happily report that I am able to control the vertigo attacks very well. I follow a fairly good low-sodium diet, take a 12.5 mg diuretic daily.I noticed several months ago how awful I felt when I ate processed food, particularly boxed and tinned goods. I am now making a very good effort to eat a balanced diet with emphasis on vegetables, lean proteins. I feel much better. I have to report that when I was actively experiencing vertigo, many times I mistakenly took Gravol for the nausea. I was hospitalized three times with the vertigo attacks over the years, they assured me the Gravol was contributing greatly to my dizziness, and vertigo. I have not touched the stuff. If I feel like the vertigo will start I now take .5 mg of Lorazapam(Atavan) as prescribed by my ENT.He explained to me that the Atavan works very quickly in your central nervous system to shut down the part of your brain that registers the vertigo/dizziness, and vestibular function. I do not recommend you use it unless you're actively having vertigo- it makes you so tired, you wont be able to function,ie drive a car,etc.I have Menieres- with the hearing loss, balance and coordination issues.Apparently a lot of people have other vestibular disorders that are not Menieres, which always comes with hearing loss.I have to say the psychological damage this disease causes is almost as hard to deal with as the physical losses.I have issues with anxiety/depression but am reluctant to seek out more medication to deal with the problems.Very difficult disease to deal with. My only saving grace is as my ENT has suggested to me, there is a life cycle to the nerve that is affected by Menieres disease.The longer you have the condition, the more you will lose hearing, but also the sensitivity that causes the balance and stability issues will resolve itself.Be patient.It does get better.Wonderful blog, by the way.Its very hard to get non-sufferers of Menieres to understand how difficult this disease can be.I hope whomever also suffers with Menieres disease sees that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I walk daily to help with my balance, do neck exercises,etc to help my balance and stability. I read that sleeping on your back eliminates quite a bit of neck/back pain associated with Menieres.It seems to be true. I also use a travel pillow at home of I'm online or sitting for longer periods than are comfortable.Every little thing we do can make it easier to deal with the issues.Good luck- please be in touch..I know I will...

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  15. The drugs I've been taking are as follows- my Meclizine was upped from 25mg 3x daily to every 4 hours; Triamterene/HCTZ once daily (I also take Lisinopril/HCTZ once daily for my BP); Diazepam 5mg twice daily. I've also had 2 injections of 4ml each of Decadron and go for my 3rd injection this coming Wednesday. I stopped taking the Triamterene/HCTZ because I found out that the "tremors" and "jolts" I was experiencing turned out to be a condition called Athetosis, a symptom of hypomagnesemia, which is from taking diuretics. My BP medicine has a low dose of diuretic as well, so from reading things (neither my PCP or EN&T Drs. seemed concerned about side effects or interactions) on drug interactions, I stumbled across hypomagnesemia and decided it was worth a try to stop taking the Triamterene/HCTZ for a few days-what do you know, the "tremors" stopped.

    As for the other meds and what help they've been, all I can say is, because of the Diazepam I sleep better (but wake up groggy, and feel drained when I take it during the day), the Meclizine, and the 2 DEX injections seem to have made the intensity of my dizzy spells "tolerable", and maybe the duration isn't as much, but the frequency hasn't changed, I still have some balance issues, the tinnitus is constant, and the "plugged" feeling is still up and down. I guess I'll see how a 3rd injection helps, and huddle with my EN&T Dr. and see what's next..

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  16. This is a great blog and the comments are very helpful as well. I have not been diagnosed with MD - although my ENT did mention it, but he said my symptoms are not "characterisic" of MD.

    I've had vertigo since last December and the last few months have been a nightmare. Many times I've been reduced to tears and felt completely helpless.

    It started out just a few dizzy spells here and there and got progressively worse. Eventually the dizziness got more intense, my ears started ringing and I had intense nausea. I've also developed anxiety from it all, and had an anxiety attack at work from which I ended up in the emergency room. After that day, every time I would get a dizzy spell, my heart would start pounding out of my chest.

    Doctors turned me away saying "oh it'll pass" blah blah blah. This frustrated me, but due to the fact that I'd had a previous experience with sudden dizziness 3 years ago, which went away within a week or two, I was waiting for the same to happen this time around. It would subside for a while, but sure enough, it would come back with a vengeance.

    Three months later into it I went back to my doctor and literally had to grip his desk and the chair I was sitting on because the room was spinning so violently, and demanded that something ANYTHING be done. From here he prescribed Serc and referred me to an ENT, and also sent me for an MRI after my suggestion.

    As it stands right now I'm in the midst of testing and awaiting results... I've seen the ENT and he seems convinced that it's positial vertigo despite the fact that I told him I had only recently begun getting dizzy when lying down because I was dizzy no matter what! I've had the MRI (which I was was freaking out about but turned out to be ok). Just yesterday I went and had a balance test which included the Caloric test.

    The Serc has made a world of difference. I've been on it since early March and have been symptom free for the last 2-3 weeks. I go off of it for a few days before an appointment so that it doesn't skew the results of the testing but then I go right back on it. I'm not ready to give it up just yet.

    I'm crossing my fingers that I'm nearing the end of this ordeal...

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  17. My daughter suffered from Meniere's disease for l8 mos. She went to 2 ENT doctors and 2 neurologists. She was on a no salt, no sugar, no white flour diet. She took a diuretic and ativan. Nothing helped. She is 37 yrs old and from Oct 2011 till Feb 2012 she was almost completely bedridden. All meals were taken in bed and she was having vertigo attacks 2 or 3 x day.

    On Feb 17 she went to an upper cervical chiropractor. This is not a regular chiropractor. They only work on the upper 2 verbrae. She began to feel better almost immediately. As of March 14, 2012 until today she has not had a vertigo attack. She is back at work, on a regular diet and off the meds. She still has some fullness and ringing in the ears but is so grateful to get her life back. Hope this can help someone else.

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    1. hello anon,
      may i ask some questions regarding the upper cervical chiropractor(the people who specialise in this area are NUCCA).
      in london there is only one who works under nucca. her price is £590 including xrays (thats 2 visits for about 2.5 hours). then each session after that if needed is £65.
      in reference to your daughter (or anyone else who has been treated with this method) after how many sessions did she feel better, and does she require regular follow up treatments?
      regards
      ali

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  18. I am so glad you replied ,Anonymous.. I think there is a very strong chiropractic component to my Menieres disease. I have had degenerative discs in my neck for decades. I was working in a store and started having a lot of neck pain while unpacking boxes of heavy quilts.My vertigo attacks started when I as working here but my ENT felt it was more of a problem with allergies triggering the Menieres.I'm so glad your daughter has found relief for many of her symptoms....

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  19. I am currently seeing a neurotologist to see what my diagnosis is. I have been suffering from dizziness, fatigue, tinnitus, nausea, loss of balance, tremors, and sensitivities to barometric pressure changes, light, and sound. It is hard for me to drive and all the doctors say don't drive but won't write it down officially so maybe I could get disability. I am currently unemployed therefore my blog: the employment wasteland. I am currently having to file bankruptcy for my business because I just could not work and run the business with all these symptoms.

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    1. Sorry to hear of your troubles ,Possum. I found this blog quite by chance. Have suffered with symptoms since 2008, diagnosed with Menieres in 2010. I was working in 2 demanding jobs(one part-time) when hit with my first vertigo attack. Thought I was having a stroke.I am now on disability but am actively looking in my local area to work part-time. I walk daily, though with a cane, to restore my core strength. Very difficult disease to manage but it can be done with the proper diagnosis. I hope you see a good ENT as I did.For it to be Menieres hearing loss must be present as well as balance issues,etc.I use noise reduction headphones when listening to music in public if alone. The traffic noises are almost unbearable. Please bear in mind, there is a strong component of anxiety/depression with a chronic illness like Menieres.I find after 4 years I struggle more with the pyschological effort of trying to stay positive and still leave a reasonably normal life.Very difficult in terms of work and what is enough and what will be too much.All I can say is take it one day at a time and reach out to others for support whenever possibler. Its a very isolating condition, for me at least.I read quite a bit about it, eat a healthy, balanced low-sodium diet,with not a lot of preservatives.Works well on a day to day basis.I wish you well..

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  20. I did end up going back onto the Triamterene. I stopped taking it for 4 days (It didn't do anything for the dizzy spells when I took it) and the "jolts" and "tremors" stopped, but I gained 8 lbs. in less than a week, so I started to take it again, and sure enough, my weight gain was all water. I drink plenty of water during the day, but going off the triamterene was making me retain it. The weight came right back off in a week. Unbelievable, but now I guess I need to take it just for that. Going for Decadron injection #4 today. My EN&T says I'm his first MD patient that has ever had to have more than 3. As for a post I put on a couple days ago, I am going to try to get in to see a Neurontologist ASAP. My EN&T is of the firm belief that the Decadron injections are the only way to go, and it's not much fun having them, but then again, neither is having MD.

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  21. My name is Liz, I am 24. I have been suffering with MD since I was 13 years old For awhile no one could diagnose what was going on with me. By the time I was a senior in high school they pegged me with MD. I had a long stretch during college when I did not get one attack. However last year I had my first child. After that I started getting attacks everyday. I went to an ear specialist, he put me on trimetrene and a low/no sodium diet. Knock on wood I have not had an attack since. The diet is VERY restricting, but it is worth it not to have a disabling vertigo attack. Start looking at all of your labels and try to keep your intake per food item/ ingredient, under 50 mg of sodium.

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    1. Hey, Liz. I'm glad you are not having severe attacks any more. It's really interesting to me how many women have reported having more trouble with MD when they are pregnant. I think it has to do with hormonal shifts, as so many other things do. It also seems as if menopause can increase the likelihood of MD events, which happened to me. Similarly, hormonal shifts are tied to migraines.

      Food for thought. Not sure how it helps, but it's interesting.

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  22. Peggy-good point!I'm sure there's a very strong hormonal link with MD in my case. An older friend of mine was having trouble with her blood pressure and having very bad vertigo attacks at the same time. It seems like there can be various reasons why MD strikes some people.MY MD seems to be allergy-related as well as neck problem I've had for some years.I really follow a low-sodium diet and take a small 12.5 mg diuretic for good measure. My vertigo has all but disappeared. Still have hearing loss and balance issues, but I'm coping.One day at time....

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  23. Hi, I'm 52 years old and have been suffering from Meniere's Disease since early childhood, however, it was not diagnosed until I was in my early 40's.

    I have the disease in both ears.
    I have always suffered with hearing loss in both ears due to the Meniere's.

    For the last 9 years or so I've taken 3-4 Meclizine (anti-vert) daily, along with 3-4 600mg Neurontin, and 1-2 .5mg Klonopin. On top of that, I also take Triametrine along with a Potassium pill to offset the affects of the Triametrine.

    This past 6 months I have begun experiencing "Drop-Attacks." I am told they are part of late-stage Meniere's. With that, they've increased my Klonopin to .75mg 4X a day. And they've changed my Triametrine to a drug called Acetazolamide (Diamox). There are some really strange side effects however, so we'll see if I can tolerate it. For instance, it numbs my face.

    I've been on temporary disability for 3 months now and I don't see any end in sight. I am grateful to the friend who alerted me to this blog. I think it's great to be able to learn from others.

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  24. Hi Shelley,
    I am glad that you found the blog, there are a lot of folks just like us who are trying to find a way to cope with.
    I also take the triametrine and find it does help some. I used to meclizine on a regular basis but it has a sedative in it and it seemed to make me very drowsy.

    Keep in touch and let us know how you are doing
    David

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  25. Having subscribed to this blog for the last few weeks, I'm amazed at all the meds people take for Menieres.My ENT prescribes me a diuretic,12.5 mg to help prevent fluid retention that can lead to vertigo attacks. I've tried Sirc for nasal congestion to no effect whatsoever. When actively having a vertigo attack, Atavan was the only med he prescribed to me.I no longer really have a lot of issues with vertigo, why I'm not entirely certain. I try not to dwell on the condition.Its' with me every waking moment,literally. I focus on feeling grateful that I have a degree of good health.Friends/relatives have lost battles to deadly diseases like cancer, Parkinsons,even ALS. Menieres will affect my life as much as I allow it, but it won't rob me of having a life to live.There's too much life out there...I wish everyone here wellness and peace of mind...

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    1. I do not know about others on this blog, but all the many medications I have taken for Meniere's have been successive, not concurrent. As each medication failed to deal with the horrifying attacks I was having, I moved on to try a different medication. It IS a lot, but Meniere's kind of reminds me of throwing spaghetti at the wall to find out if it's cooked: sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

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  26. hello
    the reason we are on so many different meds, is because there are so many secondary health issues that effect menieres.
    regards
    ali

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  27. Hi everyone,
    As I stated in an earlier post, I am taking all the meds I listed previously; Triamterene/HCTZ, Meclizine every 4 hrs., and now Lorazepam at night to help me sleep. I also have now had 6 Decadron injections. What have I gotten out of it, aside from a sore ear? Well, I've gotten some relief, but, I still have at least 1-2 spells per day, and while the duration at times can be lengthy, what they do is sort of like a roller coaster effect, somewhat intense for a bit then low intensity. I just trudge along and try to live my life the best I can.
    My EN&T appointment this week, I think I'm going to give my eardrum a break. 6 times having a needle stuck through it is making it a tad tender. My wife is once again accompanying me and we plan to discuss and have my EN&T refer me to a regionally located neurotologist. He's about an hr. away, but it will be worth the meeting with him to see what he offers up. My EN&T knows him and says he is opposed to the radical surgeries, but will do the nerve severing only as a last resort.

    Just for the heck of it, I tried going a day without the Meclizine as it makes me drowsy too, and I ended up having a more intense attack during the day, so I guess I need to take it.

    Keep plugging along everyone..

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    1. Don, when I was having frequent injections in the ear drum, my ENT installed a tube, or grommet, through the ear drum so I could just put the liquid in my ear and then squish it around tipping my head to one side so it would work its way through the tube into the middle ear. That avoided more needle sticks. But unfortunately, the ear drum around the grommet became infected and the tube had to be removed. That doesn't happen to everyone. I do remember that I felt somewhat better while the tube was working properly... I think it's because it relieved some of the pressure by providing a "valve" of sorts between the outer ear and middle ear.

      Good luck. I remember only too well what it was like having several attacks a day. :-(

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  28. Hi Don,
    I don't blame you for wanting a break for needles in the ear.
    Hopefully your new doctor can suggest another way to fight the vertigo attacks
    hang in there
    David

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